Jon Trickett MP

Member of Parliament for the Hemsworth Constituency

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It has been reported that Tory Lord Wolfson has recently received an £820,000 bonus from Next, at the same time as implying that the living wage is not realistic. Lord Wolfson also claimed that £6.70 is enough to live on.

Next have also been in the spotlight recently for recruiting overseas workers for the store in South Elmsall in a recruitment drive which saw jobs advertised in Poland weeks before they were advertised in the UK.

Lord Wolfson’s comments are a clear indication of Tory policy, the rich are getting richer while everyone else is left to suffer with low wages and insecure jobs.

Since the last election average wages have fallen by £1,600 a year with the number of people getting less than the Living Wage rising from 3.4 million to 5.3 million and I know from talking to my constituents that many people are struggling to cover the basic cost of living and low paid insecure jobs are a big part of their concerns.

Being paid the living wage of £7.65 per hour would make a huge difference to many local families.

Labour would make work pay for the many not the few starting with a minimum wage of at least £8 an hour by 2020. We would also ban employment agencies recruiting only from abroad and close loopholes which allow employment agencies to undercut wages of permanent staff and ban exploitative zero hour contracts.

Labour would also promote greater transparency of pay within the workplace by requiring companies with more than 250 workers to publish their pay scales, meaning many of my constituents who are concerned about unequal pay will be able to see if discrimination exists in their workplace.

Tackling inequality requires a rebalancing of our economy, from promoting a living wage and transforming vocational education to reforming executive pay and helping create good jobs with decent pay

Commenting on Lord Wolfson’s remarks, Tim Roache, the regional secretary of the Yorkshire & North Derbyshire GMB said:

“The example of the retailer ‘Next’ is everything that is wrong with 2015 Tory Britain.

Here we have a business that announced record profits last year, then awards its mega rich boss an £820,000 bonus whilst saying that £6.70 an hour is enough to live on!

When will employers fairly reward the people who help achieve those profits, the workers, and pay them a wage that they can use to put a roof over their heads and feed and clothe the kids”.

 

 

 

Living wage not a reality says Conservative Peer Boss of Next who has received £820,000 bonus

It has been reported that Tory Lord Wolfson has recently received an £820,000 bonus from Next, at the same time as implying that the living wage is not realistic. Lord...

First launched by Labour in 2008, National Apprenticeship Week is designed to celebrate apprenticeships and the positive impact they have on individuals, businesses and the economy.

Apprenticeships offer help to the economy and hope to our young people but sadly, under this Government, we have seen the number of apprenticeships decline by 6,780 in Yorkshire alone. With so many young people without a job, investing in apprenticeships is an integral part of creating a better economy that works for everyone instead of just a few. 

I know from speaking to young people in my constituency that apprenticeships provide a huge benefit and offer a clear path to a career for thousands of young people in our area.

Labour will create a new universal standard for apprenticeships so that they are qualifications that employers and young people can trust.  We would make sure that all apprenticeships were Level 3 qualifications, last a minimum of two years and enforce the minimum wage. Labour would also use the money the government already spends on procurement to create thousands of new apprenticeship opportunities, by requiring major suppliers on government contracts to offer apprenticeships. 

National Apprenticeship Week

First launched by Labour in 2008, National Apprenticeship Week is designed to celebrate apprenticeships and the positive impact they have on individuals, businesses and the economy.

 

The 23rd of February to the 8th of March is Fairtrade Fortnight which celebrates the impact of Fairtrade and raises awareness of the importance of buying Fairtrade produce when possible.

More than 1.3 million people, across more than 70 developing countries benefit from the Fairtrade system which ensures farmers across the developing world receive a fairer price for their work, as well as an additional premium, used by farmers and workers to invest in their communities. 

The community then decides what the Premium is spent on, whether that’s building a new school or hospital, or investing in better environmental business practices.

The UK is one of the world’s leading countries for Fairtrade products, with around 20% of the coffee, and 20% of the bananas sold in the UK coming from Fairtrade producers. We know there is still a long way to go to make all trade fair – just 1.2% of cocoa and less than 10% of tea globally is traded on Fairtrade terms.

In my office we promote the use of Fairtrade produce by only using Fairtrade tea, coffee and sugar and I believe, by buying food and other Fairtrade products from developing countries, we can help economies to grow and support the reduction of poverty. 

By even changing our basic shopping habits we can make a real difference to the lives of the world’s poorest people. However, in these uncertain times I understand it is very difficult for many families to make ends meet, and for many local people, buying Fairtrade produce isn’t at the top of their agenda.

 Image from www.fairtrade.org.uk 

Fairtrade Fortnight

  The 23rd of February to the 8th of March is Fairtrade Fortnight which celebrates the impact of Fairtrade and raises awareness of the importance of buying Fairtrade produce when...


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